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Peridural affects breastfeeding

Peridural affects breastfeeding

A recent Australian study shows that women who were born with epidural (epidural) anesthesia subsequently had breastfeeding problems as early as the first week after birth, thus being prone to having to give up breastfeeding before the age of six months, unlike by women who did not do the epidural.

A recent Australian study shows that women who were born with epidural (epidural) anesthesia subsequently had breastfeeding problems as early as the first week after birth, thus being prone to having to give up breastfeeding before the age of six months, unlike by women who did not do the epidural.
In the study published in the December 11 issue of the International Breastfeeding Journal, researchers show that 93% of the women who took part in the study breastfed their baby in the first week after birth. However, women who had been born with epidural anesthesia had difficulty breastfeeding since the first difficult days after birth.


Another observation of the researchers was that women who were born with epidural breastfed their babies a little less often than those who were born normal.
At 24 weeks, 72% of women who were not born with peridural anesthesia were still breastfeeding, compared with 53% of those who were given phenitidine or bupivacaine and fentanyl.
The results of the study presented by the researchers contributed to the strengthening of the evidence that shows that fentanyl used in peridurals could then cause difficulties in breastfeeding. Sue Jordan, a professor at Swansea University, says the effect of opioids and peridurals on breastfeeding should be seen as an "adverse effect of anesthetic." This calls for "finding other types of care for pain-sensitive women, to ensure that their newborns are not affected or disadvantaged by this adverse reaction to anesthetics."
More information on epidural (epidural) anesthesia
January 5, 2007